The President of Malta

MALTESE ON FOREIGNERS’ LIPS

Over the last few years, Maltese has become sought after by many foreigners living on our islands. The last decade has seen an unprecedented number of foreign students wishing to learn Maltese. For this reason, we must try to understand who these people are, why they want to learn our

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Rediscovering my roots by learning Maltese

My Maltese roots reach as far back as I can tell to Sliema, Birkirkara, Msida and Gozo, and I have always been fiercely proud of my heritage. Many members of my family emigrated when they were young in the 60s to London and Australia. I was born in London. Around

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Micallef Bridget, Inclusion

As a child, from the moment I started to learn to read and write at school, a seed was sown, a seed that would grow and develop into a love of books. Little did I think that this love of books would be my safety valve in the future. Over

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Translation and Maltese Identity

Dr Claudine Borg Translation is not the first thing that usually comes to mind when thinking of Maltese identity and what shapes it. However – as Michael Cronin writes in Translation and Identity –translation must be at the centre of any attempt to think about questions of identity in human

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NATIONAL SURVEY ON THE LANGUAGE STATE IN MALTA

The need for updated empirical research on the local language situation has long been felt. Years ago some studies were carried out, but there had not yet been a wide survey covering the use of language in different situations, from home to the workplace, and also studying the preferences of

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SLAVONIC POETRY IN MALTESE (translated from the original languages)

According to the encyclopaedia, the Slavic peoples are the group of peoples who speak Slavonic languages and are divided into East Slavs (Belarusian, Russian, Ukrainian, and Rusyn people), West Slavs (Polish, Czech, Slovak, Serbian, and Lucian people) and South Slavs (Bulgarian, Serbian, Montenegrin, Slovenian, Croatian, Bosnian, and Macedonian people). The

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L-ilsien Malti għal qalbi

“Bonġu!” “L-għodwa t-tajba!” “Kif int?” These phrases come second nature to many of us when greeting others and show that we are Maltese. Many important people make use of the Maltese language in their work and day-to-day life. President George Vella numbers among them. He has spoken about the need

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Learning Maltese fills me with energy

Maltese is just beautiful. This is how I, a Swedish national, feel about the Maltese language. I started learning Maltese properly in September 2020, from Scotland. A year later, I returned to Malta feeling very different from when I first left. When I visited and lived in Malta in the

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Language and social cohesion

Kit Azzopardi Last year, the President of Malta established a number of initiatives for national unity, amongst which were the Conference on the State of the Nation and the Foundation for National Unity. Language can also be a primary tool for national unity or cohesion, that is, for more robust

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Foreign ambassadors for the Maltese language

Arnaud Bouvier (French teacher)Andrea Di Vita (Italian chef)Walid Nabhan (Palestinian scientist)Jessica Schulz (Swedish researcher)Veronika Sytnyk (law student)Ema and Carla (secondary school students) What have they got in common, aside from not being Maltese? Many of us may have caught a glimpse of them speaking Maltese on social media. They all

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